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The Bernard Lee Poker Show (1/5/21): Rob Campbell (Part 2)
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In this episode of The Bernard Lee Poker Show on the Cardplayer Lifestyle Podcast Family, Bernard Lee conducts the second part of his interview with the 2019 WSOP Player of The Year (POY), Rob Campbell. Rob discusses going to WSOP Europe since he was in contention for WSOP POY. The drama at this event was incredible as the lead between him and Daniel Negreanu changed many times, including during The Colossus, which was the last event for the 2019 WSOP Europe. Rob talks about how his strategy may have been altered if there was no error in calculation. 0:00 Welcome to The Bernard Lee Poker Show as this week’s guest is 2019 WSOP Player of the Year (POY), Rob Campbell. 0:36 Bernard discusses recent poker news that began the year including Damian Salas  winning the “2020” WSOP Main Event, Huck Seed inducted into Poker Hall of Fame, Chris Moneymaker parts ways with PokerStars and James Carroll winning MSPT Venetian. 7:01 RunGood Gear Ad 7:43 Bernard welcomes Rob Campbell to the show. 8:22 Rob joins the show for the second part of his interview. 8:52 Rob confesses he never thought about WSOP POY, but goal was to win a WSOP bracelet, which he did for the $1,500 2-7 limit triple draw. 11:15 Rob talks about the $10,000 seven-card hi-lo 8 or better stud bracelet, including the final table. 13:00 Rob discusses his no-limit hold’em ability even though he is a mixed game player. 15:34 Rob talks about going to WSOP Europe and his strategy since he was contending for WSOP POY. 21:53 Rob remembers the POY race at the WSOP Europe especially a huge cash in $25,000 high roller which gave him the lead. 27:45 Rob discusses the WSOP POY situation heading into the last event (The Colossus). Note: the calculations were incorrect. 29:08 Rob remembers the event including entering Day 2 with a large stack, watching if Daniel will make it to Day 2 and playing Day 2. 35:17 Rob remembers Daniel achieving his goal and Rob busts out, thinking he lost WSOP POY. 36:45 Learn WPT Ad 37:31 Bernard concludes his interview with 2019 WSOP Player of the Year (POY), Rob Campbell. 38:53 Rob talks about how his strategy could have changed if there was no POY miscalculation. 43:55 Rob talks about $10,000 championship WSOP bracelet tournaments. 46:30 Rob talks about his future schedule including Australian poker events but also the lack of interviews from Australia. About Bernard LeeBernard Lee is a professional poker player who has more than $2.5 million and ten titles since turning pro following his 13th finish in the 2005 WSOP Main Event. Recognized as “the voice of poker in New England” by Cardplayer.com, Lee is known worldwide as a poker media personality having written for ESPN.com, Pokernews, Card Player and All-In magazines and hosting his widely popular poker podcast/radio show, The Bernard Lee Poker Show.
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Poker Basics – The math of bluffing
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For newbies we give you a simple formula that helps you understand how often a bluff has to work to be profitable. New players think bluffing is the biggest part of the game and in particular they assume that all you need to be a profitable bluffer is to be braver than your opponent. The reality is that bluffing is probably not as important as value betting for your bottom line, but when you do want to bluff there is a mathematical strategy behind it.  The size of the pot and the size of your bet determine how often a bluff has to get through to be profitable. There is a simple formula you can follow when you make a bluff to determine the bluff's breakeven percentage. That is how often it has to work to have a long term neutral outcome. If your opponent folds more often than the breakeven percentage, your bluff is profitable, if they do not, it is a losing bluff.  This is the simple formula: Risk/(Risk+Reward) = Breakeven % Let's take a simple example. It is a $1/$2 game and you raise $6 from the Cutoff preflop with 67, the Big Blind calls and the flop is AK9. You have completely missed but you think you can represent a big hand on this flop. The pot is now $13 and you decide to bet $7, how often does this bluff have to work to be breakeven?  We are risking $7 to win a $13 pot, using the formula above that would look like this: $7/($7+$13) = 35% You are risking $7 to win $13, a little over half pot, which means that you only have to get this bluff right 35% of the time to breakeven. Given your read that you can represent a big Ace or better, this seems like a really good bet. Of course, by betting small you make it more enticing for your opponent to call. So what about if you decide to bet big to make it look like you are value betting a monster? Let's say you bet full pot, so you bet $13 to win $13.  $13/($13+$13) = 50% Now you have to be right half the time to breakeven, so this is where it is important to have reads on your opponent. If they are a tight or weak player who folds a lot this might be a good bet, if they are a loose passive player it might be a losing bet.  That is the basic math of a bluff (we will cover semi bluffing later where you have a chance of making a very strong hand when called). Until then the table below is handy guide to how often you need to get your opponents to fold with common bet sizings. They are worth memorising but it is even more useful for you to play around with this formula before you start commiting the below to memory. Bet size Breakeven % 25% Pot  20% 33% Pot 25% Half Pot 33% 2/3rd Pot 40% Pot 50% x2 Pot 67% Related Resources River bluffing Join w34z3l as he tackles bluffing on the final street in Hold'em Bluffing the micros LemOn36 dispels the myth that you cannot bluff at low stakes
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Can heads-up cash make a comeback?
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With the spate of high profile heads-up challenges recently, can we see the format make a comeback with grinders online? Landon Tice Heads-up poker is dead, long live heads-up poker. Once considered the toughest and purest form of poker, and certainly a big hit with the railbirds, heads-up cash is a format that has pretty much died online. It died because getting tough regulars to play each other without an edge was too big an ask, which dried the games up. It does seem to be enjoying a renaissance right now, at the very least as a publicity machine. Phil Galfond has won three out of three Galfond Challenges and Polk vs Negreanu was a lot better than most people expected. Now Landon Tice and Bill Perkins have announced a new challenge that might ignite even more interest in heads-up cash. Tice is 'paying' Perkins 9BB/100 in their 20,000 hand No Limit match at $200/$400. What that essentially means is that Tice is giving Perkins a $720,000 head start and he believes he can still beat him. If, for example, Tice beats him by 10BB/100 he would profit $80,000 overall before rake is factored. The suggestion is that Tice believes he will beat Perkins by a much bigger margin. Closing the skill gap Bill Perkins A superior player ‘paying’ somebody to play them is not a new thing in poker, but it is in the context of high profile, live streamed, matches that are used as content and/or marketing. I actually think this idea of handicapping matches could catch on. When the match was announced PokerShares had Landon Tice as a 7/10 favourite with Perkins as a 5/4 underdog. When you consider the likely huge gap in skill between the two, these are very close odds which suggest they picked the right handicap. You could get close to 5/1 on Daniel Negreanu against Doug Polk and the skill gap there is narrower. Negreanu is a professional player and Perkins is a recreational player, after all. The skill gap is much wider with Perkins and Tice, but they have found a bet where they both like their chances. If the match is entertaining and in particular if Perkins does well, this could be a real shot in the arm for heads-up cash. It could encourage regs to play against regs and also bring recreational players out of hiding, when they previously did not enjoy being the victims of ‘bum hunting’. Will ego get in the way? Can high profile heads-up matches reignite the format? Before I get too excited and declare this is how you get heads-up cash back and thriving, there is a likely hurdle. The problem with such a bet is that it means one player has to admit they are the weaker player. Heads-up cash in particular is rife with ego and machismo, and a lot of players simply will not want to admit they need to be paid to play. But if the poker world can exercise a bit of humility, or indeed if a skilled player can trick another one into thinking they should pay them a forfeit, this could really make heads-up cash an interesting spectacle again. I bet Daniel Negreanu wished he had discussed being paid a few BBs/100 before he started his match with Doug Polk. WIll heads-up cash make a comeback online? Let us know in the comments: Barry Carter Barry Carter is the editor of PokerStrategy.com and the co-author of The Mental Game of Poker 1 & 2, Poker Satellite Strategy and PKO Poker Strategy
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The Bernard Lee Poker Show (2/9/21): Ronnie Bardah
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In this episode of The Bernard Lee Poker Show on the Cardplayer Lifestyle Podcast Family, Bernard Lee interviews the 2012 WSOP bracelet Winner, Ronnie Bardah. Recently, at the 2021 WPT Lucky Hearts Poker Open which was held at Seminole Hard Rock in Hollywood, FL, Bardah chopped three-way for the largest score of his career ($566,135). Surprisingly, the event had 1,573 entries, creating a prize pool of over $5 million! Bardah discusses how he started playing poker, his WSOP accomplishments, being on CBS’ Survivor and also playing under COVID restrictions at the WPT Main Event. 0:00 Welcome to The Bernard Lee Poker Show as this week’s guest is 2012 WSOP bracelet winner, Ronnie Bardah. 1:39 Doug Polk outlasts Daniel Negreanu in their heads-up battle, taking home $1.2 million over 25,000 hands. 2:49 Chris Moneymaker parted ways with PokerStars, but signed with America’s Cardroom to become the face of ACR. 5:37 RunGood Gear Ad 6:20 Bernard welcomes 2012 WSOP bracelet winner, Ronnie Bardah. 7:20 Ronnie joins The Bernard Lee Poker Show. 8:15 Ronnie discusses how he got started in poker. 10:53 Ronnie talks about what his most special victory/score in the poker world. 13:54 Ronnie gives some advice about limit hold’em and how it can even help your no-limit hold’em game. 19:43 Ronnie recalls his time on CBS’ Survivor. 23:46 Ronnie discusses his typical schedule during past summer WSOPs, depending on his length of stay in Las Vegas. 27:30 ShareMyPair Ad 28:16 Bernard continues his interview with 2012 WSOP Bracelet Winner, Ronnie Bardah. 30:47 Ronnie discusses the experience playing under COVID restrictions at the WPT Lucky Hearts Poker Open. 38:22 Ronnie talks about the composition of the COVID world field in Florida and Las Vegas. 41:08 Ronnie explains some specific issues that arose from the masks and plexiglass. 44:01 Ronnie talks about how grateful he is for the largest score of his career. 47:42 Ronnie remembers his trip to Asia prior to the COVID shutdown last year. 51:00 Ronnie talks about his poker plans for the rest of this year prior to the summer. About Bernard LeeBernard Lee is a professional poker player who has more than $2.5 million and ten titles since turning pro following his 13th finish in the 2005 WSOP Main Event. Recognized as “the voice of poker in New England” by Cardplayer.com, Lee is known worldwide as a poker media personality having written for ESPN.com, Pokernews, Card Player and All-In magazines and hosting his widely popular poker podcast/radio show, The Bernard Lee Poker Show.
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Seven tournament poker quotes to inspire you
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From the moment you exchange your hard-earned for a tournament ticket, you’re ‘in it to win it.’ But while you could well go into a cash game expecting to win money, virtually no-one goes into a multi-table tournament with thousands of entries expecting to be the one player left with all the chips at the end, posing for photos and collecting the trophy. There are too many factors that can influence your end result.Words of wisdom, however, can carry with you during your play at the tournament tables, and we’ve compiled seven great quotes for you to keep in mind as you take on your next poker tournament.1. “Money isn’t everything… unless you’re playing a rebuy tournament.”It’s not known exactly who said this, but it was definitely a poker player. In modern times, rebuys in tournaments have become something of a hot topic. Should they be allowed, should they be outlawed? Either way, while they’re still in the game, they’re vital to many players chances in events that allow them. 2. “One day a chump, the next day a champion. What a difference a day makes in tournament poker!” Mike Sexton said many wise things about poker, but when it comes to tournament poker, he really is the Don. Sexton knew about both sides of tournament poker, that is as a player and a broadcaster as his presenting work and successful play showed off in different ways. The drama of tournament poker is embodied by this phrase.3. “Most of the money you’ll win at poker comes not from the brilliance of your own play, but from the ineptitude of your opponents.”Lou Krieger’s many teachings don’t lead on this phrase, but they should in a way because it’s ever so true. Don’t believe the old maxim that everyone wants to win it, because many tournament players don’t have it in them to go the distance and bow out for the most part because on some level they want to. Keep your own play as brilliant as it can be and you’re going to keep improving and win more than you lose.4. “Life is not always a matter of holding good cards, but sometimes playing a poor hand well.” Jack London was one of first American authors to become a celebrity around the world and unlike many writers, earned a lot of money for his words. It’s not hard to see why, with a natural resonance and poetic flair to this very simple yet highly illuminative phrase. Good advice for life in general, this certainly applies to tournament poker. 5. “The Main Event is the only tournament in the history of poker you never have to bluff. You just have to stay alive and wait for the idiots to give you their chips.”Mike Matusow’s confidence has often bordered on arrogance, but other times, it’s gone way past it. Matusow, lest we forget, has never actually won the World Series of Poker Main Event, despite running deep and playing it for over two decades. He’s clearly not a fan of the standard, though!6. “In order to live, you must be willing to die.”Talking of staying alive, the late, great Amir Vahedi declared this priceless mantra on the near-bubble of the legendary 2003 WSOP Main Event. Vahedi, who was the 2001 Card Player Magazine Player of the Year and won a WSOP bracelet in that series, the $1,500-entry NLHE event, puts it so well. Vahedi tragically died so young at just 48 years old, but in his lifetime was also a poker coach to Ben Affleck. He lived a life, indeed.7. “There are tides in a poker tournament. Sometimes, when hopes are high and the chips are flowing, hardly a minute goes by without a dealer calling, ‘Player down,’ sending another slump-shouldered player to the rail. Then there are other times nobody gets knocked out for half an hour or more, as the players hunch protectively over their stakes, taking no chances, waiting for somebody else to do something stupid.” Pete Hautman wrote this eulogy to the vicissitudes of poker tournaments in his book, ‘All In’ and it rings true to this day. Understanding the flow of a poker tournament if crucial to surviving them and with two or three tables left, it’s all the truer.Whichever tournaments you take on this week, make it a winning performance.
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Niklas Astedt wins $348,250 in GGPoker WSOPC $10,000 heads-up
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The latest big winner in the GGPoker World Series of Poker Circuit series is Swedish poker sensation, Niklas Astedt. Taking down the $10,000-entry Heads-Up event, Astedt claimed the top prize of $348,250 by beating Mirza Muhovic in the final duel.Winning his first-ever WSOP Circuit Ring, Astedt put on a top performance and closed it out in style. The tournament, which had 94 entries and fell just short of its $1 million guarantee, saw some terrific players run deep, with players such as Wiktor Malinowski, George Wolff and Juan Pardo all making the quarter-finals.Astedt’s win is perhaps all the more remarkable for the sheer calibre of player he beat along the way. With Luke Reeves, Guillaume Nolet and Timothy Adams all going down to the Swede, Astedt enjoyed a semi-final victory against Malaysia’s Cooper Li set up a final showdown with Muhovic.In the semi-final in particular, Astedt had to pull out every trick in the book, with the match-up lasting 75 minutes. Astedt got off to a good start, but Li took down a bit pot with a straight and stole the lead. Li’s stack was hit, however, when Astedt hit a wheel straight to put himself 3:1 up in terms of stacks.The final hand saw Li commit all of his remaining chips with pocket threes on a seven-high board by the turn, but Astedt held pocket nines and made the call to progress to the final.Muhovic himself didn’t have it easy in the semi-final himself, with the Luxembourg-based player beating Canadian Ian Modder. Muhovic raced into an early lead, and never sacrificed it as he kept his foot to the floor for the rest of the contest. Modder eventually held a straight when he moved all-in with eight-six on a board showing 3-7-T-7-9, but Muhovic held jack-eight for a higher straight and that was all she wrote for the semi-finalists, both of them cashing for $99,500.In the final, Astedt took the lead, but Muhovic battled back and doubled up after rivering a nut flush. Again, Astedt ground himself into a lead, but saw it pegged back again when Muhovic doubled up with ace-jack against Astedt’s king-ten.An hour had passed, but it would be Astedt who won the day after calling Muhovic’s all-in. The Luxembourg player had moved all-in for just under 30 big blinds with ace-six, but Astedt held pocket tens and managed to fade an ace to move close to $6 million in tournament cashes on GGPoker.A legend online, Astedt is starting to hoover up major titles on GGPoker and now in the World Series of Poker. One of poker’s biggest stars could reign supreme in 2021.WSOPC #13: $10,000 Heads-Up No-Limit Hold’em Last Eight Results: Place Player Country Prize 1stNiklas Astedt Sweden $348,250 2nd Mirza Muhovic Luxembourg $199,000 3rdCooper Li Malaysia $99,500 4thIan Modder Canada $99,500 5thJuan Pardo Spain $62,188 6thGeorge Wolff United States $62,188 7th Oliver Weiss Germany $62,188 8thWiktor Malinowski Russia $62,188 
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Beef over Bill – Terrence Chan and Mike McDonald clash over betting terms
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Have you ever made a bet and only when you did so, wondered if the odds were really too good to be true?  If you’re Terrence Chan, the answer is a definite yes as has emerged in the last 24 hours in dramatic fashion.  Backing Landon Tice in the heads-up match the young pro will take on against established high roller Bill Perkins, Chan was subsequently disappointed to learn that the €1,000 maximum bet that he’d put on actually needed Tice to win while off-setting a rate of 9 big blinds out of every 100. In other words, $720,000 over the course of the 20,000-hand $200/$400 challenge.  This seven-figure handicap not being clear to Chan, he proceeded to email Poker Shares, but his old friend Mike ‘Timex’ McDonald – who owns Poker Shares – responded in what Chan thought was an unkind manner to his betting query.  As ever it seems these days, the threat of a social media outing lay like a snake in the grass, waiting to rise up and take in fresh air, and true enough, a personal conversation descended into something of a slanging match before Chan gave Timex forewarning that he was going to take this to the social media streets.  As you can see from the exchange, it wasn’t exactly friendly. McDonald and Chan are clearly friends – or perhaps were friends – but the fact that two pretty elite poker players are still able to squabble over a ‘bag of sand’ is pretty amazing to be fair. McDonald could easily just say ‘OK, forget it, sorry the terms weren’t clear’ or Chan could say ‘You know what, I thought there must be something off! It’s a grand, we’ll let it ride, lol’. Setting aside that many people don’t still say ‘lol’, what would have been wrong with that?  Both men could donate $1,000 to a COVID-fighting charity just for making poker fans read this stuff, amirite?  Which is perhaps the point. I remember being present at a super high roller tournament where  the clock would literally end the tournament because the venue’s gambling licence ran out at 1.00am. It was a very strict cut-off and there were three players. Two of these players had a fighting chance of either 2nd or 3rd place.  The other player? Igor Kurganov, who after listening to the disagreements over an ICM amount between the other two and with the witching hour well under way, managed to kindly suggest that they compromise and give the difference to charity. He was taken up on that offer and made the biggest donation himself (after winning the tournament, of course; he’s Igor Kurganov).   At some point, Tice will take on Perkins. It could be a fun one, with Tice truly appreciative of the odds and opportunity he’s been afforded.  To be completely honest, the fact that I'm even able to play for literally millions of dollars is unreal, and I can't truly express how insane of an opportunity it is.— Landon (@LandonTice) February 10, 2021 The post-handicap winner will make headlines, but the match should be a fascinating one overall. Bring on the action… just check those odds before you wager on either man to win. 
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$868,200 pot on High Stakes Poker
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We recap some stories you may have missed including why Moneymaker left PokerStars and the GGMasters Player of the Year. Huge pot on High Stakes Poker If you haven't already started watching the return of High Stakes Poker on PokerGO, the action is getting more exciting.  We have our biggest pot to date on the show as Rick Salomon and Bryn Kenney duked it out in a hand worth $868,200.  Still a way off the show's record pot which stood at $1,227,900 but it looks like we are building up to something. Why did Moneymaker leave PokerStars? The poker world was shocked when PokerStars Pro Chris Moneymaker left the site this month after 17 years of being their biggest brand ambassador.  Last week he did his first interview with Jamie and Marle on The Rake to tell us more about it.  He discussed how COVID played a part and hinted that a new endorsement deal might be on the way: GGMasters Player of the Year GGPoker Pro Daniel Negreanu You may recall that last year GGPoker hosted a year long leaderboard for the best performer in their weekly GGMasters event.  Poland's Marcin Dziubdziela was the most consistent player in that event for 52 weeks and won a package worth more than $100,000.  Specifically that is 50 tickets to the $1,050 GGMasters High Roller, 50 tickets to the $150 GGMasters and $50,000 of tournament dollars.  Cruel turn for Lex Finally, a sick beat for Lex Veldhuis when he turns a set last night's $10,300 Blowout event at PokerStars: Should Kenney have folded the river? Let us know in the comments: Barry Carter Barry Carter is the editor of PokerStrategy.com and the co-author of The Mental Game of Poker 1 & 2, Poker Satellite Strategy and PKO Poker Strategy
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Justin Bonomo wins Super MILLION$ title for $430,646
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The latest GGPoker Super MILLION$ final table saw Justin Bonomo take down the nine-man final table, winning a massive top prize of $430,646 and getting the better of some modern poker legends in the process.As we told you yesterday, it was Russian player ‘RRomashka’ who went into the final table with the chip lead, with Swedish online superstar Niklas Astedt bringing up the rear.There was to be no reprieve for Astedt, who was the first man to bust, earning $53,381 when his ace-jack was shot down by Nick Petrangelo’s king-queen, despite many kings and queens being folded. A queen on the flop and a king on the river confounded the commentators to send Astedt home and prove yet another final table couldn’t provide the win.Next to go was ‘Face-O’, who busted for 12 big blinds when his pocket tens were outrun by ‘OscarBrown’, whose ace-jack managed to hit a four-flush when runner-runner spades sent home the Mexico-based player.Out in 7th place was a player who thanked OscarBrown for winning the previous hand. ‘DaanOss’ was out for a result of $90,532 when he saw Justin Bonomo survive an all-in when extremely short-stacked, getting a fold from Artur Martirosian. DaanOss would get no such thing when he moved all-in with ace-king and got the call from the Russian with pocket queens, and Oss must have thought he was back in the hunt.Bonomo had, by now, doubled back into contention, and it would be crucial to both his surge and DaanOss’ downfall. All-in with a suited queen-ten, DaanOss had two callers in Oscar Brown who was all-in with ace-nine of spades and Bonomo himself, who could take them both out with jack-ten of spades.The flop was five high with no spades, but an ace on the turn and a six on the river gave the pot to OscarBrown and saw him nearly treble up. Bonomo was out of luck in many ways, losing a bit pot to ‘RRomashka’ with pocket aces against the Russian’s eight-six after an eight on the flop and river saw the latter double to lead with almost 10 million against Bonomo with only 1.7 million by comparison.David Yan busted in 6th place when he shoved with ace-seven off-suit and Nick Petrangelo called with ace-queen and held to reduce the field to five. That was the situation for just a few minutes as Artur Martirosian busted his short-stack of just 1.5 million with ace-four running into Bonomo’s ace-eight.With four players left, here’s how the chip-stacks lined up after that crucial pot for Bonomo.‘RRomashka’ – 7.65 millionJustin Bonomo – 5.11 million‘OscarBrown’ 4.49 millonNick Petrangelo – 3.75 millionIt would be OscarBrown who would leave in 4th place, and in horrifically unlucky style, moving all-in on a flop of 6-Q-7 of diamonds with king-queen (including the king of diamonds) while RRomashka called with queen-eight and the eight of diamonds. Somehow, the eight of clubs on the turn flipped the script and not only sent OscarBrown to the rail but gave the Russian a stack of 11.6 million chips, with Petrangelo and Bonomo not totalling that number between them.Neither Petrangelo or Bonomo wanted to bust in 3rd place, but that fate befell the former when Petrangelo shoved for 3.3 million with a suited king-jack and was snapped off by Justin Bonomo’s own all-in move with ace-king offsuit. RRomashka got out of the way and a ten-high board gave the pot and inertia to Bonomo at his fellow American’s expense. Bonomo had over 11.3 million, RRomashka over 9.4 million and the stacks swung this way and that for some time, with Bonomo up to 17 million on a couple of occasions, before dropping a little back to a 60:40 chip lead heading into the last deal just 10 minutes later.In the final hand, RRomashka had the better hand pre-flop with an off-suit king-eight up against Bonomo’s six-five. That didn’t remain the case after the 3-Q-6 flop, however, and a bet of 250,000 from Bonomo saw RRomashka check-raise  to 1 million with fresh air. Having started the hand with over 8 million thanks to T-3 out-flopping pocket sevens, RRomashka was bleeding chips on a bluff. The turn of another six only made it worse, making it less likely for Bonomo to have a six in his hand. RRomashka changed tactics and went on the attack, leading out for 2.65 million, getting a quick call from Bonomo.On the river of a four, RRomashka shoved and got a quick call to bust him from the tournament. Justin Bonomo claimed the Super MILLION$ title and the best part of half a million dollars. What a boss.Congratulations to all the players who all made a healthy profit on their $10,300 entry fee at one of the toughest and most entertaining final table yet in the GGPoker Super MILLION$.GGPoker Super MILLION$ February 9th, 2021 Final Table Results:PlacePlayerCountryPrize1stJustin BonomoU.S.A.$430,6462nd‘RRomashka’Russia$332,0733rdNick PetrangeloU.S.A.$256,0644th‘OscarBrown’Monaco$197,4525thArtur MartirosianRussia$152,2566thDavid YanNew Zealand$117,4067th‘DaanOss’Austria$90,5328th‘Face-O’Mexico$69,8109thNiklas AstedtSweden$53,381You can watch the final table of this week’s Super MILLION$ play out in full right here:
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Poker Tips by George: Politics and Poker – Use Your Imagination
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Can politics and poker ever play together to benefit the world? Is there room for politics in poker? In that regard, using my imagination, here is a poker story that could have happened. Admittedly, and importantly, it is a piece of fiction. But it gives us food for thought… Joyce C. learned to play poker from her husband, Sam, a political lobbyist for Mayor James M. Curley of Boston while Curley was in prison for corruption. Interestingly, Sam had pretty much given up the game of poker at that time – too much like gambling, he explained. To him, poker players were also the kinds of folks who played at online casino sites like Dafar slot. Always fascinated by politics and government, Joyce introduced politics to the game of poker. When Sam taught her how to play hold’em, he advocated tight play before the flop, restricting her to using only made hands (A-A, K-K, Q-Q, and J-J) and premium drawing hands (A-K, A-Q, A-J, K-Q, and Q-J) in the hole for starting hands. Joyce labeled this the “Republican way” – nothing but the best. The alternative was called the “Democratic way.” It offered a much wider selection of starting hands, adding middle and small pairs, and Hi-Lo hands consisting of an honor card and a small card (seven down to deuce) in the hole. Sam encouraged her to play the Republican way, staying to see the flop with one of the top starting hands. Needless to say, Joyce mucked the vast majority of her hole cards. But this was like a tell for her opponents, giving them a big edge. When she paid to see the flop, her opponents soon learned how best to respond. And so her winning hands were small and infrequent. She brought up the issue over dinner. She loved the challenge, the excitement, and social interaction of playing poker – but she hated to lose. Discussing the matter with her husband, they both agreed: Let’s go Democratic. The next day, Sam joined Joyce as they drove to the casino to play $4-$8 limit hold’em. Sam sat behind her, watching the action. Occasionally, they left the table to discuss the game and Sam gave her several pointers. Playing the Democratic way, Joyce found herself winning much more often. She loved being a winner! But using the Democratic way, there was one problem – a big one: Playing the small pairs, she invariably lost when she did not improve on the flop; and then it was costly to continue in the hand on the turn. (The player who holds the best hand after the flop will win about 75 percent of those hands.) The need to improve on the flop also applied to the Lo end of the Hi-Lo cards. (Note: That could lead to chasing – thus losing even more chips.) Sam’s advice: “Let’s use both ways, along with a few changes: Make it a rule that you muck your hole cards if the flop doesn’t improve them to a made hand or to a drawing hand with more than six outs.” Joyce laughed as she commented, “You sound like a lobbyist. I guess give-and-take for the Democratic and Republican ways is the best solution to this problem.” And May I Add Maybe our political leaders in the United States – the Republicans and the Democrats – can learn from this story. Share the best of what each has to offer. Can politics learn from the game of poker? Can we make this a better world? After reading this column, reread it slowly, using your imagination to decide if we can do it. About George EpsteinAfter a long and productive career as a leader in the aerospace industry, upon his retirement in the 1990s, George Epstein chose poker as his “second career.” George has been widely recognized for his many significant accomplishments and contributions to our society. These include pioneering and innovations in various materials, testing and manufacturing technologies for our defense and space programs; teaching specialized engineering courses at UCLA, other colleges, and at seven NASA centers; introducing advanced composites into Air Force space systems; and creating the Air Force Manufacturing Problem Prevention Program (has helped avoid costly failures and anomalies for space systems), He has authored many engineering reports and books; and is listed in American Men of Science; Leaders in American Science; Who’s Who in the West; Dictionary of International Biography; and Personalities in the West and Midwest. Since “joining” the poker world, George “The Engineer” Epstein has written three poker books – most recently, Hold’em or Fold’em?– An Algorithm for Making the Key Decision and The Art of Bluffing. George has organized poker groups at two senior centers, at West L.A. College, and at the VA/West Los Angeles, including teaching poker classes.He is a columnist for several poker and gaming publications. George has been elected to the Seniors Poker Hall of Fame, and was named Man-of-the-Year by the Westside Optimists, primarily for his efforts in encouraging retirees to learn and enjoy the game of poker. He firmly believes that playing poker will help to keep seniors/retirees mentally and physically healthy.
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